ASK A BLASIAN

Ask me anything. I'll answer honestly. This blog will feature my opinions on different things. Feel free to disagree. Feel free to discuss.

Anonymous asked: Im a keep it real with you, i think asian girls and blasian girls are sexy, and i would really like to get with one in the future. Which cities and states do you know have the largest asian or blasisn population? I heard its L.A

That’s not what this blog is for. This is not about “getting with” girls who are Asian or Afro-Asian, and I am not for one minute about to help you fetishize these women. There’s already way too much “blasian” fetishization going on in the blasian tag, and wayyyy too much yellow fever all over the internet. This blog will not now, or ever, help contribute to it. Do not ask me these types of questions. 

If you want to actually meet and talk to girls who have this particular ethnicity, then you’ll have to meet them the way you would any other girl. Blasian girls, and Asian girls, are not your sex toys. There’s not a “place” that you go to find them. 

Further, this is not a relationship blog, or a matchmaking site.


I was wondering could she be blasian ?

It’s difficult to tell if someone is mixed race by looking at them. Some mixed race people look entirely one race, some look a good mix between both/all ethnicities presented. The truth is, she could be blasian, but there’s no way I could tell you by looking at her. She’s a lovely girl, though.
Also, please be careful about submitting pictures of people without their permission. 

I was wondering could she be blasian ?

It’s difficult to tell if someone is mixed race by looking at them. Some mixed race people look entirely one race, some look a good mix between both/all ethnicities presented. The truth is, she could be blasian, but there’s no way I could tell you by looking at her. She’s a lovely girl, though.

Also, please be careful about submitting pictures of people without their permission. 

Anonymous asked: So My grandmother is Korean and my mother is half Korean half black, and we visit Korea every year At home we speak korean, and I've said Korea about fifty million times now.(sorry!) I have curly hair and stuff and asian eyes but like standard black girl skin and it's hard for me to make friends that are black because theres such a cultural difference. Has that ever happened to you? if so what should I do, i feel like it don't know the "black" side of me at all?

I would take a step back and look at things in prospective. You describe yourself as a person of African descent who is atypical of what is usually thought of as “black”. There are many people of African descent who are atypical of what is thought of as “black” or even black or African culture. Likewise, many Africans are vastly culturally different than African-Americans. You didn’t say where you’re from, and I’m just assuming you’re American, but I would assume that’s true for any black population of any non-African country.

I understand your dilemma of feeling different from other black people or not knowing where you fit in. It’s a sentiment shared by many mixed race people who often feel culturally different than their parents’ cultures. But understand that you are not alone in that feeling, and that said, there are probably other people of African descent that you could relate to. 

Don’t worry so much about trying to fit in with black people. Just make friends normally. In today’s multicultural society, I’m sure you can find someone who identifies as black or mixed race with whom you’ll fit in. In the meantime, you could help yourself understand black cultures better by reading up on history, and social issues that blacks encounter. I bet you’ll find you relate to a lot of these things. Where is the black side of your family from? Are they North American? Are they Jamaican? Or Haitian? Whatever that culture is, you learn about it independently. Read works by black authors, find blogs that talk about black issues. That’s one way to learn about your culture and learn how you fit in.

Likewise, seek out other multiracial people of African descent, and see how they deal with these kinds of things. We all have our own experiences, in our case, of not feeling black enough, not feeling Asian enough, feeling like we don’t fit in culturally. 

I know that I have felt like an outsider in certain situations. When I was younger, it would hurt my feelings when black kids teased me for having lighter skin, and looking different, and when they said that I didn’t “act black.” But as I got older, and I knew who I was, that type of talk pretty much stopped, because I owned who I am, and people respect that. I also think that as you get older, some things that mattered a lot when you were young seem to matter less. I don’t feel like an outsider anymore, on the Asian side or the black side, because I know where I belong. I know who I am, and I recognize where I’m different, but I don’t take that to mean something bad, or assume that someone won’t like me because of it.  Likewise, I accept the ways people are different from me, and celebrate that, as well. Our differences make humanity interesting. 

I suspect that black people will accept you just fine, even if you don’t relate to them culturally. Remember that “black people” aren’t a collective with no individuality. You might meet somebody who thinks you’re weird because you’re “too Asian”, but you might meet somebody who is black who relates more to the things you relate to. 

khaeiou7 asked: Can i still be considered blasian even if my asian ancestry is a few generations back? (my 3rd great grandfather was half japanese) does it still count.

Well, personal identity is different for everyone. For instance, many people who have mixed ancestry, but mostly one race, feel most comfortable identifying with that one race. 

I would say, if you don’t have any personal familial connection to a race or culture, it isn’t really right to claim that you are that race, even if you’re a small amount. If other people in your family don’t consider themselves part-Japanese, and you don’t have family members that you know who are Japanese, and you don’t consider Japanese culture part of your family’s culture, then, no, you probably shouldn’t claim to be Japanese. A 3rd great grandfather is pretty far removed. (Obviously, there are cases of exception, such as someone being directly of Asian and African descent from both parents, but having been adopted, may not have any ties to either culture, and so on, but I digress.)

At the end of the day it’s up to you to decide how you identify. Maybe talk to your family about it, and see where they stand on the issue. There is no shame in being interested in that part of your family’s history, and learning about it, but announcing yourself as “Blasian” could be a bit much, in this case. Especially if there’s only that small amount of Asian, and the rest, for five generations, has been black. You have to remember that many black people around the world have some sort of mixing, usually with whites, as far back as “3rd great grandfather”, but most of them don’t go around saying they’re biracial or multiracial people. 

I think it’s fine if you talk about the fact that your great-grandfather was half Japanese, and it’s fine if you find yourself interested in Japan and Japanese culture. Also, your personal identity can only be yours, so you should probably make your own mind up, or discuss it with your family. You wouldn’t want to disrespect or offend them by claiming to be something that they don’t consider themselves. 

Likewise, you wouldn’t want to disrespect or offend Japanese people by appropriating their culture.

ruinboy asked: Are you still considered Blasian if you're not half and half? Because I'm mixed with other things but both of my parents are mainly black... So am I still Blasian, because I have some Asian blood?

I think so. Most of the time, when people think “Blasian” they think one Asian parent and one Black parent, but I think having Asian blood and Black blood counts.

For instance, Jhene Aiko is a very famous Blasian, and her mother is Black & Japanese, and her father is Black & Native American. 

And people like Ne-Yo and Naomi Campbell, who are mainly black, but both have Chinese grandmothers, are still considered Afro-Asian. 

You can definitely consider yourself Blasian, as long as you have some black and some Asian ancestry. 

half filipino, half black :)

half filipino, half black :)

nayanit:

We did it. Together, we all did it. Thank you brothers, sisters, elders. Thank you, communities. “Shadeism: Digging Deeper” will finally be completed this year.  Without you, we couldn’t have come this far. Now, with you, this film will finally come to fruition. Endless love and respect. ♥.

nayanit:

We did it. Together, we all did it. Thank you brothers, sisters, elders. Thank you, communities. “Shadeism: Digging Deeper” will finally be completed this year.  Without you, we couldn’t have come this far. Now, with you, this film will finally come to fruition. Endless love and respect. ♥.

The Slanted Screen: Battling Hollywood’s Asian Stereotype(2006)

Originally aired on PBS, Narrated by Daniel Dae Kim, Written, Produced and Directed by Jeff Adachi

Beginning with promise with silent film heartthrob Sessue Hayakawa, the depiction of Asians in western cinema would fall into racist caricature for years till rebounding with the popularity of Bruce Lee in the 1970s then the rise of the independent film movement of the 80s. Featuring interviews with a host of actors including Mako, Jason Scott Lee, James Shigeta, Tzi Ma and others, as well as comedian Bobby Lee, playwright Frank Chin, filmmakers Justin Lin, Terence Chang and many more, Jeff Adachi’s critically acclaimed documentary takes a probing look at a century of “mainstream” cultural misrepresentation … along with many contemporary artists determined to change it.

Part 2

Part 3

Part 4

espritfollet:

fuckyeahethnicwomen:

nayanit:

Peace, folks. We just wanted to send through an important update on behalf of our team that the Shadeism: Digging Deeper“ Indiegogo Campaign will be ending THIS Sunday, March 17th @ 11:59pm! At this point, we’ve raised just over $6,300. Our total goal for the campaign is $15K and we still believe we can reach that with your support! Please donate where possible and please share with your networks (email, Facebook, Twitter, Tumblr, blogs, phone calls, face-to-face chats, etc). We are really trying to push hard this last week and raise the remaining funds needed for: 1) Post-Production Costs, 2) Curriculum Development, and 3) Self-Care Toolkit. We are grateful for all of your support so far, and we hope that we can work together with you all in this last big push, before we finally pull the pieces of this story together and share it with the world. Here’s to hoping we reach that goal! 

I am so sorry I didn’t promote this sooner, I had no idea this was happening! Please reblog and support Nayano and her documentary- I know most of you have seen it by now. 

It looks like they are at $12, 264 of their $15,000 goal. So close!!

Shadeism | ‘Shadeism

Three years ago, my niece and I had a conversation that would ignite an entire journey – one that we are still on today.

At the age of three, she had expressed to me the sentiment that because her skin tone was darker, this would keep her from being considered beautiful. In her child’s mind, she had already made the connection that in this world even her skin tone would matter – especially as a girl.

This issue of skin tone, of certain shades being considered “better” than others, was never missing from conversation while growing up. Yet unlike my niece, I did not have the words for it - we were able to feel its presence in dialogue amongst family and friends, but we did not have a name to call it, and so in many ways, it became easier for me to ignore, to suppress, to normalize.

But hearing these words escape out niece’s mouth moved me in such a deeply personal way that I couldn’t run away any longer from the reality of how much it was affecting and clearly hurting so many women I loved. Maybe we couldn’t change the minds of our elders and the messages of the mainstream dialogue, but we could begin to challenge, and hopefully shift our set of “ideals” for the next generation.

In response to my niece’s sharings, a team of incredible classmates and I moved forward on creating a short documentary (http://vimeo.com/16210769), which aimed to take an introductory look at this issue. Through our research, we found a name for this: shadeism. This word shadeism (also known as colorism) describes the discrimination based on skin tone, which exists amongst members of the same community, creating a ranking of a person’s individual worth based on shade.”

Reblog! 

(via fuckyeahethnicwomen)

An Observation

k—sizzle:

It’s no secret that I romanticize the fact that I’m Hapa, but lately I’ve realized that it’s probably been more for my own benefit than anything else…

As in love as I am with Hapa culture, my experiences of late have really boiled down to essentially this:

Tell someone I’m Black: “Aw, sweet! Now I can say ‘nigger’ and turn everything into a Black joke because being Black is funny and I’ll just assume I can get away with that because I know you!

Tell someone I’m Filipino: ”No you’re not,” “Yeah right,” “Well you’re Black so that cancels it out.”

That’s probably why I’ve become more keen on inclusive terms: Hapa, Blasian, etc… I gotta be proud of it myself for myself because I’m a lot less likely to get that recognition from anyone else. It gets old when someone else tries to negate a part of my racial identity for the sake of their convenience.

It gets real old.